Can Sex Cause Frequent Urination?

Women are more likely to get UTIs because bacteria from the anus and vagina spread easily to their urethra, which is shorter than men’s. Sexual activity from behind or using lubricant that contains spermicides can further spread the bacteria.

For this reason, it’s best to pee before sex and right after to flush the system. Doing so can help prevent infection.

Bladder Pain Syndrome

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic bladder health condition that causes pain, pressure and tenderness in the bladder and pelvic area. Symptoms can range from mild to severe and vary in each person. People with IC may have repeated episodes of the urge to urinate and pain in the lower abdomen or pelvic region, along with other symptoms, including blood in the urine, a feeling that the bladder is full even when it is not and pain during sex.

Symptoms of IC can worsen during menstruation in women and can make sexual activity painful for both partners. They also tend to be made worse by certain foods and drinks, as well as physical or mental stress. They can also be triggered by certain exercises, such as squatting with legs wide apart or the “happy baby” yoga pose. People with IC can help reduce their symptoms by wearing loose pants and shirts and taking steps to relieve the discomfort of sexual activity, such as using lubricants during sex and taking antispasmodic medications before sex.

If you think you have IC, talk to your doctor. He or she may suggest an imaging test such as a CT scan or an MRI, or a urine test to look for signs of infection. In some cases, your doctor may also prescribe a drug called pentosan polysulfate or heparin, which helps the bladder and is delivered through a tube inserted in your abdomen.

Read:  How to Make Yourself Squirt During Sex

Stress Urinary Incontinence

The nerves that control the bladder and sphincters send messages to the brain that let us know when our bladder is full, or when it’s time to go. Problems with these signals can cause urinary leakage. These symptoms can be caused by a physical injury or surgery, but they can also be due to conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, diabetes and certain cancers.

Urinary incontinence can make sexual activity difficult and may affect a person’s self-esteem. It’s not uncommon to feel embarrassed about urinating during sex or having to use pads. People who suffer from stress urinary incontinence often experience urine loss with physical movement, such as laughing or coughing. Women with this condition are more likely to experience urination upon penetration and urine leakage during orgasm.

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a bacterial infection that usually causes pain, swelling and burning during urination. These infections are more common in women than men, because the urethra is shorter and closer to the anus in females. This makes it easier for bacteria to enter the urethra and travel into the bladder.

There are several things that can contribute to a UTI, including pregnancy, being on antibiotics, drinking too much alcohol and caffeine, smoking and consuming spicy foods. It’s important to urinate frequently and before going to bed to prevent overfilling the bladder.

Read:  Can Sex Induce Labor at 37 Weeks?

Urinary Tract Infections

People who have a frequent need to urinate often get urinary tract infections (UTIs). Symptoms include a burning sensation, pain while peeing or in the area where you urinated, back pain, a foul odor and fever.

A UTI starts when bacteria from the urethra enters the bladder and causes an infection. This is a common condition that can happen when germs spread from anal, vaginal or oral sex. Women are more likely to develop a UTI because their urethras are shorter, making it easier for bacteria to get into the bladder.

Sex also increases the risk of a UTI because it can cause friction that can spread germs. This is true whether you’re using a diaphragm, condom or lube. Also, the spermicides in many lubes can promote bacteria growth.

Taking steps to prevent a UTI can help, such as wiping from front to back and washing the genital area regularly with soap and water. You can also avoid a UTI by not postponing going to the bathroom and emptying your bladder. It’s also important to take frequent showers instead of tub baths and wear cotton underwear, rather than nylon or spandex underwear. Also, you can reduce your risk of a UTI by taking antibiotics as prescribed. This is important, especially in pregnant women because the bacteria can travel up the kidneys and lead to a life-threatening infection called pyelonephritis.

Cystitis

The urinary tract helps the body absorb nutrients and eliminate waste, but it isn’t immune to infection. Tiny microbes that usually live harmlessly in the bowel or on the skin can enter your bladder through the urethra (the tube that allows urine to exit your body). This is known as cystitis. It can happen to anyone, regardless of sex or age. However, it’s more common in women because their urethra is shorter and closer to their anus. The movements during sexual intercourse may move bacteria from the rectum up to the bladder, increasing your risk of getting a UTI.

Read:  Disadvantages of Having Sex Everyday For Males

Symptoms of cystitis include pain or pressure in the lower abdomen, frequent urination, and the sensation that you need to urinate right away. You may also experience blood in your urine, chills, back pain, or a foul smell.

Fortunately, most cases of cystitis don’t require medical attention and will go away on their own. But you should always practice safe sex, and if symptoms persist, talk to your doctor about taking antibiotics. You can also use urinary alkalisers to reduce the discomfort of a cystitis. For more information, check out this educational support page and product selection guide from Byram Healthcare. They are a full-service urological care supplier that delivers high-quality supplies straight to your home. To place an order, visit their website today!

See Also:

Matylda

ad516503a11cd5ca435acc9bb6523536?s=150&d=mm&r=gforcedefault=1

Photo of author

Matylda

Leave a Comment