Is Sex Good For Cramps?

Women who are on their periods may feel like sex is off limits. But sex during your period can be pleasurable and even relieve cramps for some women.

Orgasms increase blood flow to the uterus, and during climax muscles contract and then release, which can help ease menstrual pain. And lubrication is provided by the natural fluids of your body, which also reduce friction between partners.

Endorphins

Have you ever wondered why you feel good after a long run or a great night of laughing with friends? The reason is that your brain releases something called endorphins. Endorphins are neurotransmitters that act as natural pain relievers and mood boosters. They are responsible for that feeling of euphoria you experience after exercising, eating chocolate or having sex. They are also the cause of the “runner’s high” that runners talk about.

Endorphins are a group of polypeptides that are released by the pituitary gland and central nervous system to deal with stress, pain and other unpleasant feelings. They bind to opioid receptors in the CNS and block or inhibit the release of other proteins that produce pain. They can also trigger the release of dopamine, a pleasure neurotransmitter.

Having enough endorphins can help alleviate stress and depression, reduce anxiety and help people get through traumatic experiences more easily. It may even improve self-esteem and aid weight loss. Low endorphin levels have been linked to certain mental health conditions, including fibromyalgia and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). People with low endorphins may have trouble saying no when offered alcohol or drugs and they might be more likely to engage in risky behaviors.

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There are many ways to increase your endorphin levels, such as regular exercise (even just walking fast), a healthy diet and meditation or mindfulness practices like yoga. In addition, spending time outdoors and in natural environments enhances the release of endorphins.

Vaginal Stimulation

Women often experience pain in the pelvic area during sex. This pain, called dysorgasmia, isn’t due to the sexual activity itself but rather to a combination of factors. These include:

The act of having sex can strain the muscles in your pelvic area, particularly the uterus. In addition, sex can aggravate muscle strains that you may have already had from other activities. This is especially true if you’re a woman who has had a C-section or other abdominal surgeries.

Dysorgasmia can also be caused by a condition such as uterine fibroids (noncancerous growths in the uterus) or ovarian cysts, which are fluid-filled sacs that form on one of the ovaries. The throbbing that occurs with orgasm can cause tension that affects the uterus and pelvic floor muscles, and this in turn causes pain.

Finally, if you have an intrauterine device (IUD), the reversible form of birth control that is placed in the uterus to prevent pregnancy, it can also cause cramps after masturbation and sex. If this is the case, contact your gynecologist for advice and/or over-the-counter pain relief.

If you’re experiencing abdominal cramping after sex, make sure to use natural or water-based lubrication. This can help reduce friction and make insertive play much more enjoyable for you. It’s also a good idea to consider changing sex positions, or if you’re on your period, using a menstrual cup.

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Lubrication

While many women avoid sex during their period due to the fear of blood, it’s actually a great time for it. Menstrual blood acts as a natural lubricant, making intercourse more pleasurable. Plus, the pain-killing endorphins that are released during orgasm can also help to relieve cramps.

A lot of people experience a surge in their libido around the time they get their periods, thanks to hormone fluctuations. This means they may be more likely to orgasm, which can help reduce their menstrual cramps. Some people even find that their periods are shorter when they engage in sexual activity during their period. This is because the muscles that contract during orgasm push out the uterus’s lining faster, which can shorten your period.

If you’re hesitant about having sex during your period, be sure to talk it over with your partner. Both of you should be comfortable with the idea, and it’s important that your partner wears a condom to prevent pregnancy and STIs. Also, be sure to spread a dark-colored towel on the bed in case of any leaks, or try having sex in the shower to avoid a messy mess altogether.

Lastly, you should know that cramps can sometimes return after climax, even if you’ve used a tampon. This is usually a sign of an infection, like a vaginal or urinary tract infection. In these cases, you should consult your OB-GYN for further treatment.

Pain Relief

The pain that can come with period cramps is actually caused by the shedding of the uterine lining. This is a natural part of the menstrual cycle, and sex can cause that lining to shed more quickly, which may help alleviate symptoms. This is because orgasms stimulate uterine muscle contractions, and climaxing can speed up the process.

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In addition, the hormone oxytocin, which is also known as the “cuddle hormone,” is released during sexual activity and can help to relieve stress and tension in the body. This can further help reduce period cramps and make you feel more relaxed.

However, you should be aware that having sex during your period can also cause bleeding and mess. So, if you’re worried about this, try having sex in the shower first or taking a condom with you just in case.

If you do decide to have sex during your period, be sure to use protection to avoid pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Even though it’s possible to get pregnant from vaginal intercourse during a woman’s period, the chances of this are relatively low, especially if you are using a tampon.

Some people also find that sexual activity during their periods helps relieve their cramps, especially if they’re having orgasms. But, if your cramps don’t go away, you should consult with your GP to determine the cause and treat it.

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